Sunday, January 4, 2009

E-publishers: Stepping-stones to getting published?

Last week, I posted about reasons why readers prefer ebooks rather than print books and vice versa. The comments were very informative, useful and insightful (thank you all for taking the time to read the post). The last comment by Evia made me decide to post a follow-up. She raised questions that I thought are good discussion topics.


1. Do you think e-publisher’s expectations from authors are lower than print publishers? Why?
2.Why did you go the e-pub route? Are they the stepping-stones to getting published?
3. Do you think print publishers are taking an even larger risks financially compared to the e-print pubs?


4. Readers, have you read an e-book so poorly written that you swear never to try buying e-books again?


I look forward to reading your comments.


Happy new year everyone.


Tierney O’Malley

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http://tierneyomalley.com

9 deadly screams:

Lynne Connolly said...

"1. Do you think e-publisher’s expectations from authors are lower than print publishers? Why?"

No. The top epublishers reject over 95% of submission to the slush pile. Each book is edited by at least two editors.


"2.Why did you go the e-pub route? Are they the stepping-stones to getting published?"

Because it's the only growth market in publishing and lots of other reasons.
They are definitely not stepping-stones to getting published, they ARE getting published.

"3. Do you think print publishers are taking an even larger risks financially compared to the e-print pubs?"

I have no idea, but they are dropping like flies these days.


"4. Readers, have you read an e-book so poorly written that you swear never to try buying e-books again?"

No more than I've read a print book and sworn never to read another print book again. Why condemn a method of production on just one book?

Anastasia Rabiyah said...

1. Do you think e-publisher’s expectations from authors are lower than print publishers? Why?

-Actually no. I will say there are niche e-publishers and many e-pubs that want work written in a certain style or that appeal to a certain genre. Editing varies from publisher to publisher, but it's in place. My interpretation is that the big print houses want a mass market story that will reach more than enough readers to cover their marketing investment. Does that mean e-pubs have lower standards? Not exactly. It's more like e-pubs are often not in it just for the money. Many of the e-pubs I have come in contact with were started by an author and tend to be run by authors and editors who are also authors. There is a small house feel to them, the comfort of a family in cooperation. I guess that means I'm happy at my houses. (o:

2.Why did you go the e-pub route? Are they the stepping-stones to getting published?

-I was tired of waiting six months or more for a responses to a submisison. Like the public, I want instant gratification--just like they want to click, buy, read all in the same day. I was published in print prior to my e-publishing experience. It's not a stepping stone. It is publication.

3. Do you think print publishers are taking an even larger risks financially compared to the e-print pubs?

I know they are. The cost of print is outrageous. Mass market trade paperback in cost effective lots is a huge investment. E-pubs don't pay for paper. They generally pay the author, editor, cover artist based on sales. Makes logical sense.

4. Readers, have you read an e-book so poorly written that you swear never to try buying e-books again?

Once again, blame the author and the house, not the way the book was published. I've read some bad things in print but I have yet to stop reading.

Linda LaRoque said...

1. Do you think e-publisher’s expectations from authors are lower than print publishers? Why?

No, I don't. Yes, there are some epublishers that produce less than quality work. That's why research is so important. When your work is published, you want it to be the finest possible.


2.Why did you go the e-pub route? Are they the stepping-stones to getting published?

TIME. I was old when I started in this business and waiting a year on a rejection/acceptance letter wasn't what I wanted to do. You hear from the editor much faster, edits are done via email, and usually your book goes to production faster.


3. Do you think print publishers are taking an even larger risks financially compared to the e-print pubs?

Of course they are. Their overhead is greater.


4. Readers, have you read an e-book so poorly written that you swear never to try buying e-books again?

I've read poor books from big houses and epubs but a poor book will not keep me from reading.

Linda
www.lindalaroque.com

Beth Trissel said...

I could have sworn I was published.

Sandy said...

I believe the world is changing, and before you know it epub will be more than an acceptable form for everything including books. The world is going Green, so we need to go to epublishers.

I'm finding some very interesting stories on epublishers that I would never find in print. Bad stories, of course, there are some at epubs as well as at the big publishers.

Frankly, the big publishers take a big risk when they publish a book. How many businesses allow stores to order as much of their product and then allow them to send it back when they don't sell it. Until they smarten up, there lives are always going to be at risk.

Sandy

Rebecca J. Clark said...

Ditto to what was already said.

There are great books and horrid books in both the print world and the epub world. If I read a bad one, I don't condemn the way it was published, but I certainly wouldn't pick up that author again.

With how green this world is getting, I'm surprised ebooks aren't getting more attention from the mainstream press.

Susan Macatee said...

From my own experience, I think e-book publishers are just as strict as print publishers regarding acquisitions. The reason I went the e-pubbed route was because the American Civil War romances I was writing didn't fit the NY publishers mold of what they consider publishable books. They can't afford to take the risks e-pubs do, so have more of the same-old, same-old genres on their lists. And truth be told, the e-books I've been reading are far superior to most of the books NY publishers are putting out.

Nan J said...

I agree with the comments above. I would add, the reason I went with an e-publisher is three-fold. One, it's hard to find (paying) outlets for short stories that don't dry up almost as quickly as you find them. I had a short story worth submitting; an e-press (TWRP) took it on. Two, in general they can be more flexible in what they take on, perhaps because of the less financial risk issue. As a writer *and* reader, I'm pleased to find oddball things in E-land that simply wouldn't be "done" in Tree land unless you've already made your name (and even then... maybe not). And three, it is the future. Amazon and its Kindle device has taken it a step further than Stephen King and his free download way back when, as far as general public awareness goes.

Evia said...

Oh, gosh.... I'd quite forgotten I'd posted that comment until tonight. It was interesting to read the responses and I do agree that I should confine my opinion to the one publisher and authors I bought from and not the ebook world at large! I just had some bad experiences that left me feeling burned. I'm not sure that I will spend my money at epublishers in the near future, but I will keep my eye on articles and reviews about them and keep my mind open.